Everyday Magic – Emily Albright

I did not enjoy this story at all. Maggie was incredibly selfish and immature. As a result, I didn’t feel excited for her professional success or romance.

Synopsis

For once, Maggie McKendrick just wants to control her own life. Her overbearing Hollywood director father has it all planned out for her: UCLA, law school, then working as an entertainment lawyer, preferably for him. But Maggie has other, more creative-spirit friendly, plans. Namely, Thrippletons School of Fashion and Design in England, and then onto becoming a designer, preferably a wildly successful one. The big snag in her plan? Getting it past her dad.

A movie shoot takes the family to the Scottish Highlands for the summer, and closer to Maggie’s dream school. While there, she runs into the charming Preston Browne. Maggie is intrigued and decides to bend her no guys rule—instituted after her ex used her to get close to her dad. Forced to keep secrets from Preston in order to protect the future plans she’s made, Maggie finds herself falling for the tall Brit. And for once in her life she knows that he’s interested in her, not her Hollywood connections. When Maggie’s father blackmails her into dating his lead actor, she isn’t left with a choice. The biggest problem isn’t having to date hunky, mega-hottie, Ben Chambers. No, it’s praying she doesn’t lose Preston in the process.

Excelling at her dream school, Maggie’s personal life is a tangled mess. She needs to decide if living a lie is worth losing Preston or chance going against her father and facing his wrath. When the tabloids expose the truth of her fake relationship with Ben, Maggie’s world is thrown into a tailspin. Ultimately, Maggie must find the courage to take risks and forge ahead on her own path.

Review

I did not enjoy this story at all. Maggie was incredibly selfish and immature. As a result, I didn’t feel excited for her professional success or romance.

Furthermore, all these characters were so hung up on relationships! It got annoying. Maggie and Daisy meet for the first time, and the first thing Daisy asks is if Maggie has a boyfriend. Maggie watches a presentation by the Duchess, and wonders if she’s in a relationship. They constantly try setting their friends up, almost to comical results! Ethan, for example, acted at first like he was interested in Maggie. Then all of a sudden, he’s madly in love as soon as Maggie tries to set him up? Huh? Not everything revolves around relationships, and I wish this story shed light to platonic relationships, especially between Maggie and other guys (unless they were gay, of course).

Is it weird that I didn’t find Maggie’s father’s verbal abuse all that bad? After they left though, his actions became downright psychotic. It became extremely unfeasible. His initial behaviour was plausible for abuse, but by the end, I didn’t understand how he’s not locked up.

The dynamics between Maggie and Preston’s group of friends was a little odd. It almost felt like she was their charity case. Yeah, you can gush about her supposed talent all you want, but it’s still uncomfortable to think that these people — who are her age — have enough money to toss around for a personal, custom fashion designer to make their clothes. The power dynamics are weird that way, and I can’t help but feel like they’re not truly friends. Maggie was so worried about people using her for her father’s name and fame, but doesn’t she end up in a position where people do the same for her talent? Oh well.

Related Reading

  • The Royal We – Heather Cocks
  • The Rock Star’s Daughter – Caitlyn Duffy
  • The Heir and the Spare – Emily Albright
  • Relatively Famous – Jessica Love

Rating: 1/5

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